Q&A with Joan Brotherton

by bqmedia

I thought that I would work out some more questions for you which relate to a number of laws needed in situations that frequently occur in bowls.

QUESTIONS :

QUESTION 1

You are at the head end and a bowl from the neighbouring rink is coming into your head. It is in danger of colliding with a bowl in your head. What would you do?

QUESTION 2

You are a marker and a bowl from the neighbouring rink is coming into the head. It is also in danger of colliding with a bowl in the head. What would you do as a marker?

QUESTION 3

During an end, when can the mat be moved and in what circumstances?

ANSWERS :

ANSWER 1

There are a number of laws that cover Question 1:

• 37.6. Bowls displacement by a bowl from a neighbouring rink (pages 53-54)

• 37.6.1. If a bowl at rest on the rink is in danger of being moved by a bowl from a neighbouring rink, any player at the head must choose whether to:

  • 37.6.1.1. lift the bowl at rest to allow the other bowl to pass and then replace it, as long as this action would not influence the outcome of the head: or
  • 37.6.1.2. stop the bowl from the neighbouring rink.

Then the following needs to happen:

• 37.6.3. If a bowl that has been stopped was in its original course and was delivered on a bias that would have taken it back onto its own rink, it must be replayed. If it were on the wrong bias the following would need to happen (page 32)

• 17.1. A bowl is a dead bowl if: (page 32)
• 17.1.5. In its original course, it passes outside a side boundary of the rink on a bias which would prevent it from re-entering the rink of play.

ANSWER 2

• 37.6. Bowls displacement by a bowl from a neighbouring rink (page 54)

• 37.6.2. If, during a singles game, a bowl at rest on the rink is in danger of being moved by a bowl from a neighbouring rink, the marker must stop the bowl from the neighbouring rink. Then the following needs to happen:

Laws 37.6.3 as above and 17.1.5 as per Answer 1.

ANSWER 3

• 6.2. During each end (page 23). After the start of play in any end, the mat must not be moved from its original position except in the following circumstances:

  • 6.2.1. If the mat is displaced, it must be replaced in the original position.
  • 6.2.2. If the mat is out of line with the centre line, it must be straightened on that line.
  • 6.2.3. If the mat is off the centre line, it must be moved to that line.
  • 6.2.4. If a player picks up the mat before the end has been completed, an opposing player must replace the mat in its original position.
  • 6.2.5. If a bowl from a neighbouring rink, moving in its original course and on a bias which will take it back into its own rink, is travelling on a path which will bring it into contact with the mat, any player on the rink on which the mat is being used can lift it so that the bowl can pass and then replace the mat in its original position.
  • 6.2.6. To gain better grip during adverse weather conditions a player can, before delivering their bowl, lift the mat, turn it over and replace it in its original position.
  • 6.2.7. After the last bowl required to be played in each end has been delivered, a player or the marker must lift the mat and place it completely beyond the face of the rear bank. Opponents in singles can, however, agree to carry the mat up the rink so that they can use it at the next end.

Following are some Definitions that may help you during your game.

  • C.3. Delivery: (Page 9) Deliberately releasing a jack or a bowl from the hand or an artificial arm device using an underarm movement. If the jack or bowl accidentally slips from a player’s hand or artificial device during delivery, the player can pick it up and start the delivery.
  • C.6. Domestic Play: (Page 9) Any play under the direct control of a Member National Authority, a division within a Member National Authority or a Club.
  • C.9. Face of the Bank: (Page 10) The surface of the bank from the surface of the ditch up to the top of any surround or edging.
  • C.13. Head: (Page 10) The jack and any bowls which have come to rest within the boundaries of the rink of play and are not dead. Law 19.1 describes a dead jack and Law 17.1 describes a dead bowl.
  • C.15. Jack or Bowl in its original course: (Page 11) A jack or bowl from the delivery until it comes to rest no matter how many times (for a bowl) it comes into contact with the jack or other bowls before it comes to rest or becomes dead.
  • C.16. Jack or Bowl in motion: (Page 11) A jack or bowl which is moving during play after it has been at rest as part of the head.
  • C.23. Neutral: (Page 11)
  • C.23.1. Neutral person: A person who is not a player on the rink of play. This includes the marker and the umpire.
  • C.23.2. Neutral object: A jack, bowl or other object not belonging to any player on the rink of play.
  • C.25. Pace of the green: The number of seconds taken by a bowl from its delivery to the moment it comes to rest at 27 metres from the mat line. The higher the number of seconds taken, the faster the pace of the green.


I hope that this information is of help to you while playing your games.